This Game Turns Google Autocomplete Into A Game Of Family Feud

This Game Turns Google Autocomplete Into A Game Of Family Feud

TechCrunch

Screen Shot 2015-03-14 at 11.07.14 AM

Damn, this is more fun than I would’ve expected.

Do you ever type things into Google just to see what whacky stuff pops up in the autocomplete box?

GoogleFeud takes that concept and turns it into a Family Feud-style game. How well do you know the hivemind?

GoogleFeud provides the first half of a search query, and you fill in the rest. Your goal is to guess as many of the most popular queries as you can.

If it provides “Should I sell my ….”, for example, you might guess “house”, “car”, or “dog”. If your guesses line up with one of the most popular queries as searched for by Google visitors, you get a point; if it doesn’t, you get a strike. Three strikes, and the game is over. Want to see the answers to that board up above, for example? Here you go.

One downside I’ve noticed: the…

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ReadMe Creates Crisp Documentation For Developers Using Your APIs

ReadMe Creates Crisp Documentation For Developers Using Your APIs

TechCrunch

ReadMe

Y Combinator-backed ReadMe wants to make it easy for any company to provide quality documentation for developers who might be interested in using their APIs.

With the prevalence of APIs, it’s easier than ever to integrate features from your favorite apps and services into your own work.If you’re one of those companies looking to get yourAPIs in the hands of third-party developers, however, it means that you’ve got more competition for mindshare.

How do you get developers to integrate your maps or restaurant review database instead of someone else’s? The obvious answer is building out a stronger showing of features. Who wouldn’t go with the most powerful option?

But as Stripe’s rapid growth has shown, even in a market where the feature base is relatively stable, making it easier to deploy your technology can go a very long way. Stripe’s documentation makes it easy to use their APIs for…

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Skype, Get Your Shit Together

Skype, Get Your Shit Together

TechCrunch

Skype is part of TechCrunch’s newsroom workflow. It’s the standard way that individual authors converse, share, collaborate and the like. We use other software to work as a team, but for one-on-one chats, Skype is our jam.

The downside is that it just doesn’t work very well. It’s become a running joke in the office: Skype’d it to you — So, you’ll get it tomorrow?

What is wrong with Skype? It can’t sync messages properly across devices, so god forbid if you use Skype on a Mac at work and a PC at home. File transfer remains ungodly slow. Messages often do not show up for some time on the machines of recipients, leading to confusion and, occasionally, bruised egos. And then there are Skype group chats that some of us can’t get into until the next day.

To quote my colleague Ryan Lawler, Skype “had one job!

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Gallery

The Equil Smartmarker Records Everything You Write

TechCrunch

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It’s been just over five months since we checked out the Equil Smartpen, a gadget that lets you record your notes and doodles to the cloud and even convert them to text. Today we’re checking out their new Smartmarker, which does the same thing but on any erasable surface.

Out of the box, the two most important gadgets are the plastic body that holds your marker and the base station that records your work. It can “see” what you’re working on for eight feet to the left and to the right, giving you plenty of space to work in knowing it’ll all be saved for later.

Writing with the Smartmarker feels like working with any other erasable marker because that’s exactly what you’re doing — instead of including a proprietary ink cartridge you have to swap out every few weeks, the Equil lets you drop in…

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LaunchKit Is A Toolkit For Developers Who Are About To Launch Their Apps

LaunchKit Is A Toolkit For Developers Who Are About To Launch Their Apps

TechCrunch

When you have an idea for an app, actually writing the app is often the fun part of the job. But once that’s done, you have to spend a lot of time on repetitive tasks like creating screenshots at the various resolutions Apple expects and setting up a landing page for your app. LaunchKit wants to make it easier for developers to get all of this done.

The company plans to launch a new tool for developers every couple of weeks. The team already launched an App Store screenshot template for Sketch earlier this year, for example, but this week, it launched a hosted version (so you don’t need to own the $99 Sketch app) that allows you to create App Store-ready screenshots (with captions) in minutes. You simply give it your high-res screenshot, add a caption, and it’ll automatically create App Store screenshots in all the resolutions Apple requires. The service is available…

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